Like our blog?! Click here to receive our monthly posts straight to your inbox!

Got Questions about Radon? We Have Answers!

Posted: April 3rd, 2012 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

“Radon: a hazardous, colorless, odorless gas”

Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., and the leading cause among non-smokers.

Radon is a hazardous, colorless, odorless gas which may be lurking in your home or rental unit. A new law passed on January 1, 2012, that requires those seeking to rent property stay informed about radon levels in the properties they seek to rent.  This law requires owners of rental units to inform prospective tenants, in writing, whether the rental space has been tested for radon and if a hazard exists. In light of this new law, we thought it might be helpful to answer some frequently asked questions about radon. Read more »


What’s in a name?

Posted: May 17th, 2011 | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet.

Evolving technology, demographics, and regulatory changes are all expanding the type and scope of services that Poison Control Centers have historically provided.  A few weeks ago, I wrote about the limitations of the Mr. Yuk logo; we are not “just the place that Mom’s call” anymore.

Last year, the IPC received about 36,500 calls on children 5 and under.  We provided triage and treatment recommendations that allowed families to treat a stunning 96% of these kids at home without an expensive or stressful trip to the ER.  Hmmmm, maybe that sounds like the place that mom’s call after all. Read more »


Nutritional Supplements: Are the Benefits Worth the Cost?

Posted: May 10th, 2011 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Everyday millions of people are bombarded with radio commercials, TV infomercials, internet ads, and aggressive sales pitches touting the health benefits (many of them unproven) of nutritional supplements. Warnings about potential adverse reactions, toxicity, food/drug interactions, and other precautions are often under-emphasized or absent.  It is important to note that dietary supplements are not regulated by the FDA and as a result manufacturers do not need to prove safety or effectiveness. Read more »


You’re a mean one…Mr. Yuk!

Posted: February 15th, 2011 | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

  Mr. Yuk is green, Mr. Yuk is mean!  The logo and the saying are a part of poison prevention lore.  Created in Pittsburgh in 1971 (yes, 2011 is the 40th anniversary of the iconic logo), it was to replace the more traditional poison symbol of the skull and crossbones . . . a symbol that did not deter the little Pittsburgh Pirate fans in the Steel City.

Mr. Yuk quickly developed a wide reach and has recognition value with adults who were children in the 70’s and beyond.  However in the age groups most at risk for unintentional poisoning, 18 to 35 months of age, Mr. Yuk had no deterrent effect in this most vulnerable age group.  More than one study cast doubt on the efficacy of Mr. Yuk as a deterrent in the 1980’s.  Still, it is a symbol representative of poison prevention and poison centers for many. Read more »


A Year in Review: Children’s OTC Cough & Cold Products Label Changes

Posted: January 11th, 2011 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Hopefully you’re not home reading our blog with thermometer in mouth, feet soaking in hot water, lemon tea brewing on the stove, fighting off the nasty bug that you or your kids picked up at work or school – but it is indeed winter, the time of year when so many of us suffer the miserable effects of the common cold or flu.  Naturally, the use of a variety of non-prescription pain-relievers, fever-reducers, and cough/cold remedies goes up dramatically during the cold season, so it shouldn’t surprise you that the number of accidental poisonings and adverse drug reactions to these products does as well, especially among children.  In 2009, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) reported a whopping total of 88,355 cases in the US involving cough and cold medications (CCMs); 46% involving children younger than 5 years old.   Read more »